Untitled Header Image Omaha Metropolitan Area Homeschool Graduation  May 4, 2019
 

Accredited or Approved?

Use of Nebraska K-12 Accredited or Approved Schools

Accreditation or approval is a process by which an oversight agency places its "seal of approval" on a school stating that the school meets that agency's standards for education and operation.

In Nebraska, accredited (public) or approved (private) schools must meet the requirements as defined by Nebraska law and by the Nebraska Department of Education.  Schools may also have to comply with district specific requirements.

If a parent chooses to incorporate a state accredited or approved school into their exempt school program of instruction, then they must be aware they are stepping back under Nebraska’s accreditation or approval requirements for the classes and activities they are accessing—meaning standards of education, philosophy, and curriculum content will reflect that of the accredited or approved schools.  Some parents may find this an acceptable exchange for access to the select class or activity they desire.  Yet, we advise parents to weigh all things in the balance carefully.

According to Section 79-2, 136 R.R.S., each school board is to establish policies and procedures for part-time enrollment in the local district.  These very policies and procedures “may require part-time students to follow school policies that apply to other students at any time the part-time student is present on school grounds or at a school-sponsored activity or athletic event.”  Parents should fully explore the local policies and procedures they will be required to follow.  Sometimes the local policies and procedures require things beyond participation in the class or activity that is desired.  Parents may need to agree to standardized testing, parent-teacher meetings, participation of school counselors in the exempt school, or completion of forms and surveys for data collection… just to name a few. 

Parents should be fully informed so there are no surprises.  Ask many questions—then make your decision with all of the available information on the table.